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Grief and Coping
Unfortunately, gun accidents often lead to death, leaving the family with feelings of loss, anger, and guilt. These articles offer advice and counsel for those dealing with such loss.




The Seattle Times, 10/8/2000
Important!Mothers of Seattle boys involved in accidental shooting speak out
Last spring, Jake Sheehan accidentally shot his best friend Jared Davidson. Now each mother speaks about forgiveness and the healing of two children. Read Jake's mom's comments. Read Jared's mom's comments.


Important!The Other End of the Barrel
Shirley Lochowitz, a homemaker and former police officer, founded this organization after her son, Nicholas, was accidentally shot in their basement by a friend. The site tells her tragic story as well as provide links to resources. The group has also produced a video.


SAMHSA/The Center for Mental Health Services
Age-specific Interventions at Home for Children in Trauma: From Preschool to Adolescence
This brochure offers age-specific tips and suggestions on how parents can help their child when exposed to a disaster or traumatic event.


The News Journal (New Castle, DE), 2/6/2002
Delaware Shooting Victim, 10, Battles Back Gamely
Joshua Perdue fidgets in his chair. When he finally starts to rise, he does so slowly. His left side nearly immobile, he holds a cane in his right hand and carefully makes his way across the kitchen, shuffling with an old man's tiny steps. On his right hand, the scars of a bullet's entrance and exit are visible near the wrist.


National Institute of Mental Health
Helping Children and Adolescents Cope with Violence and Disasters
This publication helps parents, teachers, and mental health professionals help young people avoid or overcome emotional problems in the wake of violence or disaster. The fact sheets discuss the impact of violence and disasters and suggest steps to minimize long-term emotional harm.


Sean O'Sullivan/The Washington Post, 8/13/2000
Little Brother Lost
A journalist reflects on dealing with his younger brother's suicide.


National Crime Prevention Council
Making Peace -- Tips on Managing Conflict
Conflict produces stress, hurts friendships, and can cause injury and death. We can't always avoid conflict but we can learn to manage it without violence. That way, we use conflict to improve our lives and to learn from past mistakes. (Requires Adobe Reader.)


Yale Child Study Center
National Center for Children Exposed to Violence
NCCEV provides resources concerning children’s exposure to violence within homes, schools, and communities. Their collections – both virtual and physical – address research, public awareness, and the application of principles and practices in intervention and prevention.


New England Journal of Medicine, 3/24/2005
Parents Who Lose Children May Suffer Increased Mental Illness
This study found that parents who lost a child were at a higher risk of addiction and mental illness problems. This is the largest study to date of parent bereavement and mental health.


The National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children
New!Recognizing the Signs of a Grieving Child
by Rebecca Roberts Konarz, MSW, LSW
This article offers warning signs of a child affected by a traumatic experience or event that resulted in the loss a loved one. It points out the signs for two age groups: infants/preverbal toddlers and those children who are toddlers, preschoolers, and school age.


Connect for Kids, 4/20/2000
Safer Communities, Safer Kids
Schools are one of the safest places where kids spend their time, but fears for student safety have increased in the wake of school tragedies. As we mourn the lives lost and damaged by violence each year, we must take the opportunity to move beyond individual tragedies and reflect on ways we can strengthen our children, our families and our communities.


Pathfinders Publishing
New!Talking About the Loss of a Brother or Sister
by Janis Harris Lord
This article provides help on how to talk about the loss of a child or sibling in the family. It suggests that it is best for families to grieve together, and offers sound advice on how to heal together.


American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Talking to Children About Snipers and Terrorism: Tips for Parents
This article provides parents with simple ways to have an open dialogue with children, answer children’s questions, identify physical symptoms that may indicate stress or anxiety, and work with school personnel concerning classroom discussions.


Omaha World-Herald, Nebraska, 5/25/2005
Teen Suicide Report
Understanding teen suicide is essential as the epidemic continues to grow around the country. This study is focused in Nebraska where 15 to 20 teens kill themselves every year. Here the teen suicide rate is one-third worse than the nation's. These deaths and the stories behind them reveal much about the social forces contributing to teen suicide.


St. Louis Post-Dispatch, 11/21/1999
When Communities Try to Figure Out Causes of Violence, a Sense of Isolation Always Surfaces
Few contemporary topics are as troubling as school violence. To advance the discussion and in the search for ideas about prevention, Imagine St. Louis turned to Harriet Grazman, who has counseled hundreds of students and adults and is a former elementary school teacher in University City. Bibliography and on-line resources included at end of article.


Resources by Subject
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Please note: Common Sense and its endorsing organizations do not necessarily endorse all content stemming from the links provided in this page. All resources in these web pages are provided for information purposes only and should not be construed as professional advice. Advice and opinions on mental health and other medical issues should be obtained through consultation with a licensed and trained professional.


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